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2016_05_01_06

Issues > Issue n1 2016 > section1_2016
TEACHERS’ PEDAGOGY FROM THEIR NATIVE COUNTRY, MATTERS TO STUDENTS?

Junko Winch

doi: 10.18355/PG.2016.5.1.69-85

Abstract
The British universities’ teaching and learning environment is multicultural and an increasing number of international students from all over the world are studying in the UK. Japanese language teaching in this study was also under the influence of this globalisation. Students who are studying Japanese are also under the influence of the teachers’ educational culture and teaching pedagogy. This study investigates how multicultural students who were studying Japanese responded with the Japanese teaching approach which were not familiar and consider the results from an educational cultural perspective. The study was conducted for one semester to multicultural students who were studying Japanese in 2009/2010 at a university in the South of England. The Japanese teaching approach called Japanisation was applied to these students. The concept of Japanisation was taken from a study of the Japanese car manufacturing industry and adapted to the language teaching context for the purpose of this study. Questionnaires and observations were used to generate the data. Both questionnaire and observation results showed that the majority of students showed negative responses at the end of the study towards Japanisation. However, gradual positive reactions to Japanisation were observed during the course of observation as students from the long-term educational culture seemed to accept Japanisation more easily than those from the short-term educational culture. From these contrasted two results, it may be possible to conclude that students’ response to Japanisation may relate to their long-term culture as observations confirmed that students who were from long-term educational culture responded more positively than those from short-term culture during the course of observations.

Key words 
culture, higher education, Japanese language teaching, multicultural, long-term orientation (LTO)

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